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Lit World Interviews

Most of the reading public are not part of writers social networks in any big way. They probably all have a personal Facebook or a Google+ presence, and quite a few people these days have Twitter accounts to see what the Kardashians world is up to. A lot of them are on the mailing lists of book recommendation sites though, and that’s why an important part of marketing should be popping your books up on them now and then in addition to your normal tweeting and sharing on your regular sites.

If you can afford trying for a listing on Bookbub then that’s a good option, but not only is it going to get more difficult to get accepted there now that traditional publishers are using it, it’s also quite expensive. That doesn’t mean you have to do all advertising yourself though. There are a couple of much cheaper options…

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Is My Novel Ready for Proofreading? by Guest Author Wendy Janes @wendyproof

Lit World Interviews

Is My Novel Ready for Proofreading?

I love my job as a freelance proofreader, but sometimes authors make it very difficult for me to do my job effectively.

However brilliant your writing, however delicious your story, if there are too many errors and inconsistencies, you are asking too much of your proofreader to spot everything.

Here are a few examples of things that should have been removed by the author/developmental editor/copy editor prior to proofreading. Just in case you’re wondering, they are all products of my fevered imagination:

  • A tear-jerking family saga opens with Davina playing with her five-year-old brother, Oliver, on the sprawling lawns of their darling papa’s country estate. When our feisty heroine rescues sweet young Oliver from his evil kidnappers two years later, he is ten years old. The hapless Oliver dies in a fire soon after his rescue, and (miraculously) reappears at Davina’s sumptuous wedding to…

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Academic versus Vocational : Why Does It Need To Be A Choice ?

Disappointed Idealist

I want to link Debra Kidd’s passionate blog about academic snobbery here, as I was involved in the conversation on Twitter which I think part-prompted this. I agree with much of what Debra says, although not all, as I’m the Head of of a very successful and very large history department in a state comprehensive and I’m rather less convinced than Debra is that, given the choice between Cromwell and Shakespeare, most students will run towards the bard.

The essence of the argument on Twitter was between some tweeters who argued that schools should impose a very limited range of traditional academic subject choices on students, and other tweeters (including myself), who argued that all students should have as wide a selection as possible of vocational and academic choices. I found myself accused of being in favour of “narrowing” education by suggesting it should be broader, because only traditional academic subjects…

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Self-Editing for Fiction Writers Review by @RonovanWrites

Lit World Interviews

renni browne dave king

This was a great gift I received. One reason it was great is because I asked for it. And that means I did  not have to pay for it. I would have but writer’s love free things.

I love this book. It’s a 5 Star Rating from me here and on Amazon.

I intentionally read the book before starting my most recent novel and it has really helped a lot. In what ways?

  • I am aware of some little things that show a professional from an amateur
  • I can make at least some things right so during my next draft I don’t have to struggle through those parts
  • My beta-readers, proofreaders, editors or even possible co-authors don’t have to find a way to tell me that my writing stinks, well at least no more than usual
  • It has a check list at the end of each chapter to help you…

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The Benefits of Writing a Terrible First Novel

Words of Margaux

As some of you may know, I recently completed a novel for the first time. After two failed attempts to complete manuscripts before, just the fact that I wrote “The End” was an accomplishment to me. I took some time away from the book in attempt to return to it with a fresh perspective. What I saw upon my return, however, shocked and disappointed me. My finished book, the one I spent three months writing, was not worth reading. Many find it difficult to admit this about their own creations – believe me, it took me a while to accept the fact myself. In spite of how disappointed I was by the first draft of my book, there are invaluable lessons that I learned throughout the process.

Many might say that I shouldn’t put so much pressure on myself, a first draft is never as good, and it was only…

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